“Media Art/Kitchen Aomori,” photo: Kuniya Oyamada, 2014

Oni-bi (fen fire)

2013–2017

“MOT Satellite 2017 Spring: by the deep rivers,” video: Yoi Suzuki

This work was made using a self-made glockenspiel left behind by American musician and pipe organist Victor Clark Searle, who immigrated to Japan after the end of World War II.
A faint electric current is passed through the screen. When the curtain blows in the wind and touches the screen, the electric current passes through it, creating small sparks. The musical scale that sounds on the glockenspiel changes depending on where the curtain touches the screen, creating gamelan-like reverberations that combine to produce a kind of otherworldly music.
The title refers to the mysterious fires found in Japan and throughout Asia that are said to be earthly manifestations of the spirits of humans and animals. The opening of this exhibition happened to coincide with the Japanese Bon Festival, when spirits are said to return to the world of the living. In addition to giving visitors a taste of summer, these screens, fireworks, fans, and other objects comprised an artwork that intimately evoked the figure of an old musician who had passed away two years earlier.

“Media Art/Kitchen Aomori,” photo: Kuniya Oyamada, 2014

“Media Art/Kitchen Aomori,” photo: Kuniya Oyamada, 2014

“MOT Satellite Spring 2017,” photo: Haruyuki Shirai

“MOT Satellite Spring 2017,” photo: Haruyuki Shirai

Oni-bi (fen fire)
2013–
Materials: Glockenspiel, Solenoid, Drumstick, Net window, Conductive strings, etc.
Size: Dimensions variable
Form: Installation

Oni-bi (fen fire)