“Assume That There Is Friction and Resistance,” Photo: Kuniya Oyamada, 2018

You Locked Me Up in a Grave, You Owe Me at Least the Peace of a Grave

2018

Palais de Tokyo, 2018

Rotating speakers are inspired by Leslie speaker (Rotary speaker). Vibrating sounds generated from two piano threads with electric bows are echoed in a space. A rotating stairs at the center is a homage to Monument to the Third International (1919-20) by Vladimir Tatlin. The form of inclined spiral stairs that seemed to be destined to a perpetual rising / falling movement evokes viewers the notion of eternity. The title is derived from a word mentioned by Louis Auguste Blanqui, a french revolutionary in 19th century, unbearable to noises of the dungeon where he had been imprisoned. His last work, The Eternity According to the Stars, an original cosmology peculiar to him, which was totally unrelated with a social movement he had devoted his life to was written during his confinement. And so the French “revolution” broken out in Paris at that moment could be linked to the“revolution” as the operation of the universe that Blanqui, locked up in a dungeon, had tried to depict at the same moment.
Rotary, spiral and revolution — the work is a sound sculpture revolving around a thought about energies arisen from rotating movement.

Photo: Kuniya Oyamada

Photo: Kuniya Oyamada

Photo: Kuniya Oyamada

Photo: Kuniya Oyamada

Photo: Kuniya Oyamada

Photo: Kuniya Oyamada

Photo: Kuniya Oyamada

Photo: Kuniya Oyamada

You Locked Me Up in a Grave, You Owe Me at Least the Peace of a Grave
2018
Materials Iron, Motor, Speaker, Tripod, Paper, Computer, and Other Materials
Size Dimention variable
Form Installation

You Locked Me Up in a Grave, You Owe Me at Least the Peace of a Grave